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Torben Pedersen (torbenbp)
Advisor
From: Denmark
Posts: 1024
Ray

What type of camera do you use?

T
Torben Pedersen
Moellevaenget 15 2th
7900 Nykoebing Mors
Denmark
"If it works dont break it..?"
2010-10-13 18:02
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rayman
Advisor
From: United States
Posts: 499
icontorbenbp:
Ray

What type of camera do you use?

T


I can't remember right now. I'll let you know when I get home after work. check your mail.

Ray
2010-10-13 18:09
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Torben Pedersen (torbenbp)
Advisor
From: Denmark
Posts: 1024
Okay..
Torben Pedersen
Moellevaenget 15 2th
7900 Nykoebing Mors
Denmark
"If it works dont break it..?"
2010-10-13 19:19
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rayman
Advisor
From: United States
Posts: 499
icontorbenbp:
Ray

What type of camera do you use?

T


Fujifilm S5200 FinePix

Ray
2010-10-14 01:27
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Tcensor
+1
Posts: 81
The S5200 has a TTL contrast-type auto focus system and features Single AF, Continuous AF and Manual focus modes with your choice of AF frame selection: AF (Center) or AF(Multi). The focusing range in wide angle is from 3.0 ft. (0.9m) to infinity, in telephoto from 6.6 ft. (2.0m) to infinity. The Macro mode covers from 0.3 to 6.6 ft (0.1-2m) in Wide and 3.0 to 6.6 ft (0.9-2m) in Tele. The aperture range is f/2.8-8.0 in wide angle and f/3.2-9.0 in telephoto, both in 9 steps. If you are trying to get too "up close and personal" to your subject - it will start to give you trouble. You MUST stay within the designated focal length and use the highest resolution format. Then, once you uploaded the picture to your computer set the image on your graphic program so as to see "actual pixels". Cut the desired area and paste it on to a new image.

I hope this helps. :)
Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.

- Frank Zappa
2010-10-14 11:57
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rayman
Advisor
From: United States
Posts: 499
Here is a photo taken from my phone. I will try playing with my camera tonight.

Ray

2010-10-14 19:45
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Tcensor
+1
Posts: 81
Hi all,

I was buried under a pile of work and could not fin any time to write lately. Thankfully, I will have some free time over this week end and will continue where I left off.

Sorry to hold up the "natural flow" of things on this thread - but sometime life gets the better of me... :)
Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.

- Frank Zappa
2010-11-04 12:30
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Tcensor
+1
Posts: 81
OK. A week later, and I am about ready to do the next segment. Again, sorry for the long delay - but it's just gotten a bit crazy here.

Anyhoo, a few words about magnification. The short answer is "Yes, you will need it." the longer answer is as follows:

There are several ways one can choose to magnify the work. The exact type of magnification you choose depends on a number of factors. First, is your willingness (ability) to invest in magnification. The more elaborate your optics are, the more they cost, and it is important to understand that not everyone NEEDS a super dooper high tech setup like an inspection microscope or the like. A simple X10 Jeweler's loupe is quite sufficient to inspect the work, and in fact, many of the worlds greatest engravers worked with this type of magnification very successfully. A cursory examination of the type of magnification equipment used by professional engravers today, in the USA mint for example, will reveal that they still do, on the most part, use standrd X15 loupes.

However, loupes take some getting used to and are not "problem free" when attempting to conduct the actual work under magnification. For one, it is very hard to hold a loupe in one's hand and engrave with the other - and even once mastered, this technique leaves a lot to be desired since loupes have a tendency to create "depth of field" issues as they are not a binocular solution. From this perspective it might be easier for the novice to use a visor rather than a loupe.



In the picture above: My rather messy and overloaded work space with a spread of some magnification solutions. Top left to bottom right:

X30 Geological inspection microscope
X15 Jeweler's loupes
X10-30 spectacle mounted watchmaker's loupe
X5 jeweler's loupe (home made from salvaged lense and a light bulb's screw in fixture.
X10 inspection loupe w/ ruled stand
X2 magnifying glass
X45 visor

Top and forefront: OMANO engraver's binocular microscope.


Enter the magnifying visor. These are head mounted devices that allow you to free your hands and work directly under magnification. The simpler visors will allow from X5 to X12 magnification and are perfect for "larger" lines, but there are also "surgical" visors that will allows for up to X45 and in some cases X75 magnification and come complete with their own light source. These tend to be more costly and frankly, if you are not a professional, or a very serious hoby-cat you will probably not need them.

And then, there are microscopes. I will not say too much about them at this point because I think that they deserve a whole section on their own. I use an OMANO OM99 binocular engraver's microscope with a .5 barlow lens. It is not a Carl Zeiss for sure, but as far as "Bang for Buck" goes - it is the best solution for me and it certainly answers my needs.

Just to whet the apetite, here is something I am currently working on. It's a rosewood traveling box for a hone with Ivory and .925 Silver:

[Last edited by Tcensor, 2010-11-13 13:35]
Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.

- Frank Zappa
2010-11-13 08:50
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Tcensor
+1
Posts: 81
It's been a while since I posted. Where I live, we get constantly targeted by rockets, and it's raking havok with my ability to contribute regularly. In any event, here a a few pictures of a Japanese style straight razor I completed recently. I hope this makes up, if only in part, for my low rate of contribution to this marvelous forum.









[Last edited by Tcensor, 2011-11-11 11:12]
Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.

- Frank Zappa
2011-11-11 09:26
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Paul
Advisor
From: United States
Posts: 1388
wow:O

Those pics alone are well worth all the time I've logged on here :thumbup:
Paul
"Focus on the journey, not the destination. Joy is found not in finishing an activity but in doing it" - Greg Anderson
my blog- and it works again :p
2011-11-11 22:58
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Deckard
Posts: 156
One word, "Exquisite"
2011-11-11 23:26
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geruchtemoaker
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 693
a masterwork indeed :thumbup:
The Bible and several other self help or enlightenment books cite the Seven Deadly Sins. They are: pride, greed, lust, envy, wrath, sloth, and gluttony. That pretty much covers everything that we do, that is sinful... or fun for that matter. - Dave Mustaine
http://www.artisanshaving.org
2011-11-12 10:23
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Tcensor
+1
Posts: 81
Sorting through some more photos, I came across this bracelet. I made it out of .925 silver, with inlay of copper and some overlay of bronze. It is a large and heavy piece (253g !!!). I competed the work on it about 6 months ago. It took almost 3 months to complete from idea to the final object.







Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.

- Frank Zappa
2011-11-12 12:53
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BlacknTan
From: United States
Posts: 176
This thread is most interesting for me on two levels..
The first is due to the fact that I have no artistic abilities of my own, and I've always stood in awe of those that do. And second, I've spent a good part of my life acquiring and using shotguns at various pursuits.. Upland birds, and clay target sports. As such, I've been exposed to many fine shotguns, including many high grade Belgian Brownings from the facilities of Fabrique Nationale in Belgium.
Felix Funken, as mentioned in the first post, was the Master Engraver, although there were many others such as Cargnell, Vranken, et.al. It was the golden age of firearms embellishment, and I had a small amount of work done by Angelo Bee, another engraver from the Herstal plant in the waning years of the great Masters, who subsequently took residence in California.
Interestingly, and many purists rebuke the new form of engraving like Bulino, there is a "new breed" of artists involved in the adornment of firearms and the work is utterly awe inspiring..

http://www.creativeart.it/smalti

Also, one of the World's Finest engravers lives and practices his art not very far away in the state of Vermont.. Winston Churchill. It would takes years to have a commissioned piece finished by this gentleman, if one can afford it!

http://wchurchill.com/

My thanks to Tcensor for starting this thread, sharing his artistry and bringing to mind some memories.
[Last edited by BlacknTan, 2011-11-12 17:44]
Better a diamond with a flaw than a polished pebble...
2011-11-12 15:02
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Tcensor
+1
Posts: 81
Some very inspiring work on these links BlacknTan. I think if I was up against the wall and had to choose my greatest engraving heros I would probably be L. D. Nimschke or Salomon Smolianoff...
Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.

- Frank Zappa
2011-11-12 18:16