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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047
iconJim:
If you peruse other forums you know what I'm talking about. "The whiskers were wiped away from my face like freshly-fallen snow from the windshield of a speeding Ferrari." "The blade sliced through my whiskers like a hot katana through a drop of single-malt Scotch."


That gave me a good, loud laugh. :)
"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2011-09-27 10:40
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Dr Ralfson Bwhahaha (tat2Ralfy)
Associate
Posts: 3610
Hahahaha "She Beard" hahahaha
We Are All Pioneers In Our Own Right.
The Infamous Coticule Crew
Pip Pip Old Bean
2011-09-27 17:46
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Pieter Ketelings (Pithor)
From: Finland
Posts: 89
With all the people bragging about their BBS shave every time, with one pass + touch-ups, I wouldn't be surprised if at least half of the actually carried 'she-beards' that could be sneezed off by our cat.

As for the legendary 'Sheffield whisker melters' plus those Ferrari windshields: I must say after shaving with about four sharp Sheffield (near) wedges, it most likely is a case of poetic hyperbole - whose beautiful metaphorical desriptions I can most certainly appreciate - which I have taken with a big ass grain of salt from the start. I did notice that, yes, there is less feedback while shaving when compared to shaving with, say, a frame-back Swede, but the end results were pretty much the same.

And to not have this thread derail completely from the OP's post, I found a lovely John Barber a little over a months ago. It has this notch on the toe end of the spine and is, I suspect, still in it's original carved horn scales. It's a real looker, even though some previous owner had shined it up a bit too strong for my taste, it doesn't seem to go well with the age and remaining pitting on the blade.

So far, after two attempts, I have failed to hone it up properly. Have to give it another try one of these days, since I have had quite a bit of honing practice lately. Either way, legendary hair nuking aside, they are very nice to look at, and I don't doubt once I get the edge on mine that it'll be a really good shaver.
Loose, footloose!
Put on the Sunday roast!
2011-10-05 12:17
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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047
iconPithor:
So far, after two attempts, I have failed to hone it up properly. Have to give it another try one of these days, since I have had quite a bit of honing practice lately.

Tape, tape and, again, tape. "Tape is your friend" to shamelessly quote myself, especially with wedges-alike. Took me two layers to establish an ok bevel, then applied third for UniCot. Good luck. :thumbup:

regards,
Matt
"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2011-10-05 14:15
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Pieter Ketelings (Pithor)
From: Finland
Posts: 89
Tell me about it. I always hone with tape, but noticed that for full or near wedges tape is inevitable/mandatory. Today I succesfully honed up a stubtail full wedge bengall, already had a bevel set with two layers of tape (even though I thought I messed it up last time, which was a pleasant surprise), dilucoted (first dilucot ever) with the two layers of tape, got a great edge. I meant to put on a third layer, but completely forgot. It doesn't seem to have mattered much in the end.
Loose, footloose!
Put on the Sunday roast!
2011-10-05 16:40
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Dr Ralfson Bwhahaha (tat2Ralfy)
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Posts: 3610
So are you going to send it over to visit the buffing station Matt?

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
We Are All Pioneers In Our Own Right.
The Infamous Coticule Crew
Pip Pip Old Bean
2011-10-26 15:09
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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047
Well, frankly, I'd love to do it on my own, if I am able. But I keep pounding the same question. I have abrasive papers, up to 2k and pastes, 120, 200, 300, 600 and some general car polishing paste for final mirror surface. Maciek's (macrob's) post about his Puma got me pretty puzzled about the pastes, I always thought that those low grit pastes come first. Somehow mine don't do anything with those black pits so maybe I should go back to something like 200 paper and work it up from there? But then, why 200 paste and 200 paper work totally different? :confused: I thought I'd save some time using those pastes instead of hand sanding - I'd be glad if you shared some wisdom, good Doctor. Mind you, as far as machine tools are concerned, I only have a dremel with hard felt and cotton wheels (okay, there are some abrasive wheels, too).

BTW, I'm making, or rather actually upgrading a pair of scales for it. Since yesterday, they've been laying with added liners, epoxy glued and clamped. :)

regards,
Matt
"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2011-10-26 16:27
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Pieter Ketelings (Pithor)
From: Finland
Posts: 89
iconMatt:
BTW, I'm making, or rather actually upgrading a pair of scales for it. Since yesterday, they've been laying with added liners, epoxy glued and clamped.


Dark wood or bone, I hope. It just works so well, especially on Sheffield wedges.
Loose, footloose!
Put on the Sunday roast!
2011-10-26 17:04
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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047
Neither, I believe. I'll make another set from a buffalo horn blank, when I get more experienced with actual scale making. For now I'll just settle for some vintage, refreshed, probably celluloid black ones, with white liners added and, again black wedge (if all goes fine). I'm treating it as a learning project, though I'm not planning to do anything carelessly. :)

cheers,
Matt
"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2011-10-26 17:12
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Pieter Ketelings (Pithor)
From: Finland
Posts: 89
Ah, I see, pimped up scales. I feel your pain. I have to great slabs of black watterbuffalo horn lying around, but still haven't had the time and courage to actually work on them. I've had a bit of practice on beech wood though, wedgeless without power tools, which isn't finished either.

Somewhere in the future, the blades aren't going anywhere. I'm looking forward to your results, it sounds need-o.
Loose, footloose!
Put on the Sunday roast!
2011-10-26 17:22
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macrob
From: Ireland
Posts: 47
iconMatt:
Somehow mine don't do anything with those black pits so maybe I should go back to something like 200 paper and work it up from there?


I would say you should go back to 80 or 100 grit if you really want to remove those black pits.

Beautiful razor .I hate rust and pitting on razors but i'd consider to leave it that way.
Regards.
Maciek.
2011-10-26 18:15